Author Archives: Shirley Lovegrove

EMERGENCY WORKER SAFETY

New law protects emergency and retail workers from violence

The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill received Royal Assent and became an Act of Parliament on 28 April 2022. 

The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts (PCSC) Act equips the police with the powers and tools they need to combat crime and create safer communities, while overhauling sentencing laws to keep serious sexual and violent offenders behind bars for longer. 

New court orders will crack down on knife crime, making it easier to stop and search known knife offenders and prevent future tragedies. Alongside this a new legal duty will be placed on different parts of the public sector to work together to tackle serious violence. 

Also included in the measures are mandatory life sentences for those who kill an emergency worker in the course of their duty, known as Harper’s Law. Other measures include: 

  • Extending the pardons and disregards scheme for abolished same-sex offences 
  • A review of tackling crimes motivated by a victim’s sex or gender 
  • Commissioning reviews into spiking and sex for rent 
  • Giving the Food Standards Agency powers under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) 
  • Creating expedited public space protection orders 
  • Creating a new offence of recording breastfeeding without consent 
  • Including online hate offences in football banning orders 
  • Extending the time limit for bringing domestic abuse prosecutions. 

Harper’s Law

Harper’s Law is named after PC Andrew Harper, who was killed in the line of duty in 2019, the law will introduce mandatory life sentences for anyone convicted of killing an emergency worker whilst committing a crime. 

It follows an unwavering campaign by Andrew’s family, including his widow Lissie, and the Police Federation, and comes after a number of meetings with the Justice Secretary and Home Secretary.

Roofing contractor sentenced after worker falls from height

3rd February 2022FacebookTwitterLinkedInWhatsAppEmailCopy LinkShare

A roofing contractor has been sentenced after an unpaid casual labourer fell through a skylight during the renovation of an old asbestos cement roof, at an industrial building in Exeter.

Plymouth Magistrates’ Court heard that on 23 October 2018, the labourer, who wanted to gain industry experience having never previously worked on roofs, was instructed by Ian Davey (trading as Exe Fibreglass) to cut fibreglass for the roof of the building. Once the fibreglass was cut, the labourer went up onto the roof to observe the fitting by Mr Davey and another colleague. He stepped on a fragile skylight, which gave way causing him to fall five and a half metres to the floor below. He suffered multiple fractures to his hand and wrist, which required surgical wiring to repair, and also factures to his ribs.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the work had not been properly planned. There was a lack of training or experience in the supervision of others working at height. There were no preventative safety measures in place for the skylights such as netting, crawl boards or safety harnesses in use.

Ian Davey trading as Exe Fibreglass of Beacon Hill, Exmouth pleaded guilty to breaching Section 9(2) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005. He was given a 12 month community order, which includes 80 hours of unpaid work, and has been ordered to pay costs of £3,000.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Peter Buscombe said: “This incident could so easily have been avoided by simply using correct control measures and following safe working practices.


“Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work-related injury and fatality in this country and the risks associated with working at height are well known.”


Notes to Editors:
1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk

Press releaseProsecutionasbestosbuilding safetybuilding safety lawconstructioncourtemployerfallfalls from heightfinedhealth and safetyhealth and safety executiveheightHSEinjuriesinjurynewsprosecutionroofsafetysentencedworker

Quarry Incident

INCIDENT ALERT
LOCATION: CEMENT PLANT ALERT STATUS: Normal
ACTIVITY: MAINTENANCE & HOUSEKEEPING DATE ISSUED: 06/01/2022 17:26:25
SUB ACTIVITY: N/A INCIDENT No: 03601
TITLE
Fatal 4 – Contractor gets alkaline dust in eyes and respiratory system
COUNTRY OF ORIGIN
ACCIDENT / INCIDENT DETAILS
During a kiln shutdown, industrial cleaning contractors were vacuuming dust from inside the kiln dust room. Suddenly a large amount of
material poured into the room via the inlet chute, filling the air with a thick cloud of dust. All three contractors in the room managed to
make their way to the exit. While doing so, one of the contractors stumbled and fell, which led to alkaline dust entering his eyes and
respiratory system.
The cause of the inflow of material is thought to have been a blockage in the inlet chute that suddenly released itself while the contractors
were in the room. This potential hazard had been underestimated during the planning and risk assessment of the job. With hindsight, it is
recognized this assessment relied too heavily on the fact that this had never happened before rather than whether or not it could happen
ACCIDENT / INCIDENT IMAGES
Click image to enlarge
Spillage of dust
LEARNING POINTS / ACTIONS TAKEN
The corrective action following the incident is to install a slide valve into the chute which will be closed during entry into the room to
completely eliminate the possibility of dust blockages or build-up releasing and entering to room.
When planning a task and undertaking risk assessments consider what potentially could go wrong rather than relying on previous
experience of the task.

Safequarry.com

Quarrying company fined £300k after blasting operation puts workers at risk

IN COURT

Breedon Trading Ltd has been fined for safety breaches after a fly rock projection event occurred during the use of explosives.

A blast at Cwt-y-Bugail Quarry in Llan Ffestiniog, Gwynedd, North Wales, resulted in rocks being ejected outside of the danger zone, Llandudno Magistrates’ Court was told.

The HSE’s investigation into the incident, which occurred on 15 January 2020, found that flyrock from the blasting operation, had landed approximately 270m away, punctured the roof of an occupied work shed, and put a hole in the outside pane of the occupied manager’s office skylight window.

It was reasonably practicable for the company to ensure that the blasting did not give rise to danger by increasing the danger zone, clearing the increased danger zone, increasing the quality and quantity of stemming for the explosives in the blastholes, and by ensuring an adequate blasting specification was produced and authorised.

HSE found that there were poor stemming practices, the written specification was prepared after the firing of the blast, and an inadequate danger zone was in place. As a result there was a projection of flyrock outside of the danger zone that caused a quarry operative to run for cover and put other employees at risk when the roof of the shed they were working in was punctured.

Breedon Trading Ltd of Pinnacle House, Breedon Quarry, Breedon on the Hill, Derby pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 (1) of the Health & Safety at Work etc Act 1974 by virtue of the Quarries Regulations 1999, regulation 25.

The company has been fined £300,000 and ordered to pay £2,534.80 in costs.

After the hearing, HSE’s Adrian Jurg, HM Specialist Inspector of Quarries, commented: “Blasting operations at quarries are inherently high risk, and these risks must be rigorously controlled by good explosives engineering practice and in accordance with legal requirements.

“It is unacceptable that employees, and potentially members of the public, be put at serious risk of being hit by rocks that could easily lead to death or serious injury.”

BP plans major green hydrogen project in Teesside

BP Hydrogen project

• Together with BP’s already-proposed ‘blue’ hydrogen project (H2Teesside), HyGreen Teesside strengthens Teesside as the UK’s leading hydrogen hub to decarbonize industry and heavy transport.

• HyGreen Teesside and H2Teesside together have the potential to deliver 30% of the UK’s 2030 target for hydrogen production. 

BP Hygreen Teeside

BP Hygreen Teeside

BP today confirmed it is planning a new large-scale green hydrogen production facility in the North East of England that could deliver up to 500Mwe (megawatt electrical input) of hydrogen production by 2030.

HyGreen Teesside will be developed in multiple stages, and is expected to match production to demand and build on experience to drive down costs. The company is aiming to start production by 2025, with an initial phase of some 60MWe of installed hydrogen production capacity. A final investment decision on the project is expected in 2023.

Hygreen Teesside is the latest addition to BP’s integrated UK business portfolio, which includes delivering 16,000 UK charging points by 2030, 3GW gross of offshore wind in the Irish Sea, and BP and Aberdeen city’s partnership deal.

BP is working with industry, local administration such as Tees Valley Combined Authority (’TVCA’) and the UK government to increase the pace of decarbonisation in transport. Its blue and green hydrogen projects in Teesside, together with the proposed Net Zero Teesside power project, is expected to further support economic development and regeneration in Teesside.

By creating ’high-quality’ jobs in both construction and operation phases, BP says the projects will support local education and skills development to create a highly skilled UK-based hydrogen supply chain.

Louise Jacobsen Plutt, BP’s senior vice president for hydrogen and carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS), said: “Low-carbon hydrogen will be essential in decarbonising hard-to-abate industrial sectors including heavy transport. Together, HyGreen and H2Teesside can help transform Teesside into the UK’s green hear. BP plans major green hydrogen project in Teesside, strengthening its people, communities and businesses. This is exactly the type of energy we want to create and more importantly deliver.”

HyGreen Teesside is expected to fuel the development of Teesside into the UK’s first major hydrogen transport hub, leading the way for large-scale decarbonisation of heavy transport, airports, ports and rail in the UK.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps, said: “This exciting project builds on our ongoing development of hydrogen in the area through the Tees Valley Hydrogen Transport Hub. It’ll help pave the way for its use across all transport modes, creating high-quality, green jobs in the process.

“This is excellent news following the recent COP26 summit and I look forward to supporting industry to develop new technologies as we build a cleaner transport system and work towards a net-zero future.”

BP says the combined 1.5GW capacity of HyGreen Teesside and H2Teesside could deliver 30% of the UK government’s target of developing 5GW of hydrogen production by 2030. Industries in Teesside account for over 5% of the UK’s industrial emissions and the region is home to five of the country’s top 25 emitters.

Tees Valley Mayor Ben Houchen, said: “This is yet another coup for the region as we lead the UK in creating the cleaner, safer and healthier jobs and communities of the future. We’re quickly becoming the go-to place for innovation in the hydrogen sector, thanks to our status as the UK’s first Hydrogen Transport Hub and BP’s commitment with other schemes, such as Net Zero Teesside and H2Teesside.

”Whether it’s hydrogen, carbon capture, utilization and storage or offshore wind, Teesside, Darlington and Hartlepool has the know-how, sites and ambition to deliver.” 

BP has already announced a series of Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) with potential industrial customers for hydrogen in the Teesside area, including both existing and planned operations, as it grows demand for the hydrogen expected to be produced by H2Teesside.

BP has also recently signed an MoU with Daimler Truck to pilot both the development of hydrogen infrastructure and the introduction of hydrogen-powered fuel-cell trucks in the UK. It says HyGreen Teesside would be a further important step in the development its hydrogen business and its first green hydrogen project in the UK.

BP is pursuing proposed projects for green hydrogen production at its refineries in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, Lingen in Germany and Castellon in Spain. It has also carried out a feasibility study identifying opportunities for green hydrogen production in Western Australia and was most recently chosen as the preferred bidder to develop a green hydrogen production hub in Aberdeen. 

Article Forecourt Trader

Virtual Course Delivery

After successful virtual courses being delivered during the pandemic it has been decided that this will be continued to be offered as an additional way of course delivery. Meeting with industry sectors has resulted in Zoom or Microsoft Teams being an acceptable way of ensuring training can continue to be delivered. Not all training providers have chosen to adopt this method and all are continuing with classroom based training.

The only exemptions are Core Construction and the full Petrol Retail courses, these are classroom based only and cannot be delivered remotely.

Please check with your local training provider for further information on their upcoming courses. If looking for courses on the website they will be found in training events under the remote learning area.

Fine after maintenance fitter dies in fall from height

IN COURT

A forging company has been fined after an employee suffered a fatal injury when he fell from height from a mobile tower scaffold.

A Stokes Group Limited employee George Clifford was fatally injured at the company site on Cochrane Road,  Dudley, West Midlands, after falling from a tower scaffold whilst dismantling a Eumuco 2000 Tonne Forging Press, Dudley Magistrates’ Court was told. The incident happened on 19 June 2019.

The HSE’s investigation found the company had failed to have a safe system of work in place for the dismantling of the forging press and did not provide information, instruction and training for the task. The mobile scaffold tower was erected without suitable and sufficient measures namely guard rails to prevent a person falling a distance liable to cause injury.

Stokes Group Limited of Cochrane Road, Holly Hall, Dudley, West Midlands pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The company was fined £50,000 and ordered to pay costs of £2,885.20.

Speaking after the hearing, HSE Inspector Karen Sweeney said. “The incident could have been prevented if the work had been properly planned, risk assessed and a safe system of work put in place for the dismantling of the forging press. When devising a safe system of work, consideration should have been given to the selection of work equipment for work at height and whether a mobile tower scaffold was appropriate.

“The incident could also have been prevented had the tower scaffold been erected with suitable and sufficient measures such as guard rails, to prevent a person falling a distance liable to cause injury.”

Yorkshire company fined over £1.8m after two workers injured in fall from height

Food manufacturing company, Karro Foods Ltd, has today been sentenced after two workers suffered serious injuries when they fell over 4 metres through a rooflight.

Leeds Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 13 April 2016, the two workers were investigating a leak from the roof at the Malton site of Karro Foods Ltd, which the workers did not realise contained several rooflights. The workers were walking closely together and both stood on the same roof light which consequently fell through due to the weight.

One worker suffered four fractured ribs, a punctured lung, and muscular contusions to his outer right thigh. The other suffered a fractured skull, muscular injuries to his right leg and injuries inside his ear which cause ongoing problems with his balance, memory and mental health.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the roof was made of asbestos cement and had several rooflights situated along it but they were not visible due to the build-up of moss and dirt which had accumulated over the years. Employees had also not been made aware of them.

Karro Foods Ltd of Hugden Way, Norton Grove Industrial Estate, Malton, Yorkshire pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The company has been fined £1,866,000 and ordered to pay £8,019 in costs.

 After the hearing, HSE inspector Mark Slater commented: “This was a wholly avoidable incident, caused by the failure of the company to provide adequate controls against the risks arising from working at height.

“Consideration of roof fragility and rooflights, visible or not, should be made, especially on older buildings.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk[1]
  2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/ [2
  3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk[3]
  4. Please see the link below to the page on HSE’s website that is the best guide to doing it the right way: www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg401.pdf

Multiple injuries following fall from height

Company fined after worker suffers multiple injuries in fall from height

Construction company Rivergate Developments Ltd was sentenced today for safety breaches after worker Nathan Howes fell 2.7 metres through an open stairwell.

Leeds Magistrates’ court heard how, on 31 May 2017, Mr Howes, aged 26, was working on the upper floor of a cricket club in Sowerby Bridge, West Yorkshire which was under refurbishment. Mr Howes was removing a ‘genie lift’ from the forks of a lift truck, so that steel beams could be lifted into place, when he stepped backwards and fell through the stairwell opening. Mr Howes sustained multiple injuries including a fractured spine, a fractured skull and a small collapse of one of his lungs, and was hospitalised for six days. Mr Howes still attends physiotherapy as outpatient and has not yet been able to return to work.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that Rivergate Developments Ltd had carried out a risk assessment which identified there would be gaps in the floor through which a person could fall. However, they failed to put in place any measures to either prevent or mitigate the consequences of a fall. Such measures include the use of fixed edge protection systems to prevent falls or the use of fall arrest bags to mitigate falls.

Rivergate Developments Ltd of Rivergate House, Carrhill Road, Mossley, Lancashire pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The company has been fined £20,000 and ordered to pay £1,020 in costs.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Jayne Towey commented: “Falls from height often result in life-changing or fatal injuries. In most cases, these incidents are needless and could be prevented by properly planning the work to ensure that effective preventative and protective measures are in place such as edge protection or barriers built to the correct standard.

“This incident could have easily been prevented if the company had installed adequate edge protection around the opening to prevent falls.”

Notes to Editors:

    1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise. www.hse.gov.uk
    2. More about the legislation referred to in this case can be found at: www.legislation.gov.uk/
    3. HSE news releases are available at http://press.hse.gov.uk
    4. Please see the link below to the page on HSE’s website that is the best guide to doing it the right way: www.hse.gov.uk/construction/safetytopics/workingatheight.htm

Apprentice injured on bending machine

Engineering company fined after apprentice injured on bending machine

An engineering company has been fined after an apprentice suffered serious hand injuries when he was drawn into machinery.

Cannock Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 3 March 2018, the 19-year-old apprentice was forming a piece of sheet metal into a radius using a three-roll bending machine. He was wearing gloves when his hand was drawn in by the in-running nip between two steel rollers. As a result, the apprentice had two fingers severed and also suffered crush injuries to his right hand.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that a safe system of work, adequate training and effective supervision were lacking. The use of gloves increased the likelihood of being drawn in to the dangerous parts of the machine.

Air Management & Design Ltd of Spencroft Road, Newcastle under Lyme, Staffordshire pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. The company was fined £12,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1,301.20.

HSE inspector Wendy Campbell said after the hearing: “A young man’s life has been changed because his employer failed to ensure adequate training in and supervision of a safe system of work for the use of a powered three roll bending machine.

“This is a reminder to all companies to check that fully fingered gloves are not worn, and safe systems of work are in place and being followed for operation of dangerous machinery such as three-roll bending machines.”

Notes to Editors:

  1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE)[1] is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. We seek to prevent work-related death, injury and ill health through regulatory actions that range from influencing behaviours across whole industry sectors through to targeted interventions on individual businesses. These activities are supported by globally recognised scientific expertise.
  2. Further information is available about the legislation referred to in this case link to external website[2].